Hintergrund
zum neuen Layout (Vorschau)
 

Attractions in the Modern City 


Hardly any other city in Germany can so aptly be called the “Modern City” like Chemnitz. Emerging in a time of industrial modernity, which continues to inspire the dynamic development of business and science in Germany today, Chemnitz represents the influences of both the cultural and architectural modern age.
The past and future combine uniquely here. Discover the city’s charm over the next few pages!

 

Wohl auf keine andere Stadt in Deutschland trifft die Bezeichnung „Stadt der Moderne“ so zu wie auf Chemnitz. Erblüht zur Zeit der industriellen Moderne, die nach wie vor Impulse gibt für die dynamische Entwicklung von Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft in Deutschland, steht Chemnitz gleichzeitig für die Einflüsse der kulturellen und architektonischen Moderne.

In Chemnitz gehen Vergangenheit und Zukunft eine einzigartige Verbindung ein. Entdecken Sie den Charme der Stadt auf den folgenden Seiten!

 

Inner city

Downtown Chemnitz has undergone unparalleled development since 1990. While the scene was characterised by vast empty spaces in the late 1980s/early 1990s, it now represents the city’s pulsating central hub.

 

Reputable architects have created a complete new, modern inner-city structure. Winning the 2006 DIFA Award for downtown districts proves that all the time and expense have been worth it, recognising the successful mix of retail, offices, dining, living, recreation and culture in the new downtown area.
21st century Chemnitz impresses its residents and visitors with outstanding, architecturally attractive shopping:

  • Galerie Roter Turm (architects Hans Kollhoff & Walter Brune)
  • Kaufhaus Peek & Cloppenburg (Christoph Ingenhoven)
  • Galeria Kaufhof (Helmut Jahn) 
View all contentClose content

 

Art

Chemnitz’s art and cultural scene emerged as a result of economic and social processes. Business and industry saw the city achieve material wealth and cultural diversity.

 

Be inspired by the works of great modernisers of art:

  • Karl Schmidt-Rottluff as the pioneer of expressionism
  • Marianne Brandt from the Bauhaus school of art
  • Stefan Heym, who set new literary benchmarks

The Chemnitz art collections are among Germany’s most reputable art galleries. The Gunzenhauser Museum, opened in 2007, is home to one of the largest private collections of classic modern art and art from the second half of the 20th century, including one of the world’s largest Otto Dix collections. Chemnitz’s museum landscape will be further enhanced in spring 2014 with the State Museum of Archaeology. As Germany’s only theatre catering to five genres, Chemnitz Theatre creates a stir well beyond regional borders, with repertoire classics, re-discoveries and premieres of its opera performances.

View all contentClose content

 

Architecture

Residential Wilhelminian-style buildings, Art Nouveau villas, public and private buildings from the Bauhaus era, as well as numerous impressive industrial buildings, all attest to the past and present successes of Chemnitz’s economy.

 

Bauhaus artist and co-founder Henry van de Velde also left an architectural legacy in Chemnitz.

The wealth during the Wilhelminian era saw the emergence of numerous villas, including Villa Esche, designed by artist Henry van de Velde, and today open to the public.

The Kaßberg is one of the largest combined Wilhelminian and Art Nouveau quarters in Europe. The neo-Gothic Theaterplatz symbolises a return to classic ideals.

View all contentClose content